Kate Russell on FinTech and diversity in the workplace – MAF153

On the show this week, I talk to the journalist, BBC presenter and technology geek, Kate Russell.

We chat about FinTech, diversity in the workplace and online gaming for charity.

Welcome to episode 153 of the Marketing and Finance Podcast.

Kate Russell on FinTech and diversity in the workplace - MAF153

What you’ll hear about in this episode

  • How Kate uses gaming platform Twitch to raise money for charity
  • Current developments in technology that we should all pay attention to
  • FinTech developments people in financial services industry need to know
  • Why diversity in business is important
  • Her tips for becoming a public speaker, especially for women
  • A great example of social listening

Who is Kate Russell?

A journalist, a TV presenter, technology expert, online gamer and all-round technology geek. Kate’s had a portfolio career and went into writing reviews for games magazines from working in sales. She believes that gives her a unique perspective on the content she creates and allows her to pay attention to the marketing angles too.

Having reported for Sky TV and the BBC, she’s been with BBC’s Click (previously Click Online) for the last 15 years, looking at news and developments in the world of consumer technology.

Summary of our chat

Kate uses Twitch, a live stream to chat and watch people play games as a way of raising money for the charity Special Effect, which helps disabled people play video games. Her viewers have helped her raise £40,000, and technology companies have donated too.

Her top future tech tip for anyone creating online content is to pay attention to speech recognition. Google reported that one in five searches through their Android app came through voice search, and consumers are now asking more natural language long tail questions.

For financial services businesses, where everything is highly regulated and it takes time to implement changes, the focus should be on the customers in a decade from now – Generation Z.  24/7 connectivity means that they have no time to spare and won’t wait for you to catch up.

Kate is passionate about diversity in the workplace. She would love to see more women in the IT industry and thinks brands without a representative staff don’t appeal to a broad audience. She feels that diversity in culture is equally important, as is employing people on the autism spectrum.

Her advice for female speakers: Build your confidence by speaking at careers events at your old school. Find conferences you’d like to speak at and pitch to the organisers, or speak at smaller, free events and film yourself to create an online portfolio. Be proactive in finding opportunities, and after the first couple things will snowball.

And finally, Kate shared a great example of social listening: A US woman chose the Twitter handle @theashes and was bombarded with tweets about the cricket series. She had no interest in cricket but turned her initial frustration into branded T-shirts. The international media coverage was spotted by Qantas, who paid for flights to Australia to watch The Ashes.

Links:

Recommended Books

Kate doesn’t read business books or self-help, conceptional idea books, as she doesn’t find them useful. She reads fiction or fact and believes there’s a skill to engaging narrative and storytelling, and make people interested in what you’re going to tell them.

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Pete Matthew on building client trust through consistent audio and video content – MAF150

This is a milestone edition, and my guest is Pete Matthew.

He’s an expert financial planner, a prolific content marketer and fellow podcaster. We talk about how answering questions with video and audio content gives him a constant stream of clients for his business.

Welcome to episode 150 of the Marketing and Finance Podcast.

Pete Matthew on building client trust through consistent audio and video content - MAF150

To help celebrate 150 episodes of the Marketing and Finance Podcast I couldn’t think of anyone but Pete to sit in the spotlight. As a financial planning expert and a content marketer whose built a massive audience for his videos his own podcast, his story is a perfect fit for my goal for the show. Ideas and inspiration from someone doing great things in the world of marketing or finance. And in this case, both.

What you’ll hear about in this episode

  • How he started answering finance questions with a video camera on the beach in Penzance
  • Building the Meaningful Money Podcast into a finance show that’s popular worldwide
  • How the podcast generates a constant stream of clients for his business, Jackson’s Wealth
  • Pete’s role as a financial planner and a financial educator
  • His top tips for professionals looking to start putting together content

Who is Pete Matthew?

Pete’s a Certified Financial Planner and Chartered Financial Planner providing fee-based holistic financial planning advice in Penzance, West Cornwall. He’s also an award-winning podcaster and video blogger. His passion is to spread the word that anyone can take control of their personal finances.

He’s fulfilling this passion via his financial education website and podcast, MeaningfulMoney. Through video, podcasting and social media he’s reaching thousands of people every week with his simple financial planning message.

Links:

If you enjoyed – Pete Matthew on building client trust through consistent audio and video content – please leave a comment or a review on iTunes.

And if you know anyone who would enjoy the show – please share it with them. You can use the buttons below to share on social media.

Don’t miss an episode of the MAF Podcast – subscribe now.

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Fighting complexity in marketing and kicking the butt of impostor syndrome

“What if the audience think my messages are too simple?”

This thought came crashing into my mind as I sat in aeroplane thirty-five thousand feet above the Alps.

Beyond the oval window, I could see the clear blue sky, snow-tipped mountains and lakes glistening in the sunlight. I was on my way to a marketing conference in Montenegro to give a speech on fighting complexity in marketing. The organisers invited me because they saw a video of my performance at CMA Live last summer in Edinburgh. So, I should have felt confident, motivated and ready to rock that stage.

Instead, when the cabin crew lady handed me my coffee, I felt a sinking feeling and a rush of nerves.

Fighting complexity in marketing and kicking the butt of impostor syndrome

I thought, “What the hell are you doing?”

“In two days’ time, you’ll on a stage in front of an audience of 150 people for whom English is not their first language. And they’re marketing directors of big companies or marketing agency people.”

“Can I really teach them anything?”

“Will they be remotely interested in keeping things simple?”

I wondered what the odds were the plane would develop a technical fault and we’d divert to Austria. I guess a heavy dose of imposter syndrome came and hit me right between the eyes.

But here’s the reality.

I ran up the stairs to the stage in Podgorica top the heavy beat sound of UK hardcore techno-music (a link to my side hustle as a Body Combat instructor). Imposter syndrome defeated by the atmosphere of the event and the warm welcome given by the conference organisers and the other speakers and guests.

The speech went off without a hitch, delivered in my usual upbeat, motivational style.

Fighting complexity in marketing and kicking the butt of impostor syndrome

And do you know what? They loved the speech. I’d adapted it to compensate for the language difference. For example, they wouldn’t know what “muppetry” meant in the context of big companies doing stupid things. But mainly, it was the same “fighting complexity” speech I’d done in Edinburgh and many times since.

They applauded the simple messages. They wanted to talk afterwards about how simple marketing strategy could be.

My fear the audience would think my messages were too simple was unfounded. They positively embraced the simplicity. They were crying out for it.

After, I was somewhat embarrassed, but humbled some of the guests wanted to take selfies with me.

Fighting complexity in marketing and kicking the butt of impostor syndrome

I felt reassured my wish to help people keep marketing simple is the right direction for my consultancy business and for my future speaking engagements.

Companies the world over make marketing, especially the strategy part, far too complicated.

Young people shy away from it because it sucks the energy and creativity out of them. The veterans resign themselves to it because they lack the will to fight against it. Strategy sucked the energy and creativity out of them long ago.

So.

Can I really teach them anything? Yes!

Will they be remotely interested in keeping things simple? Damn right!

Over the last 2 years as I’ve refocused on my speaking career after a short break. I’ve invested in some top-notch training and coaching. The World Class Communication course with Marcus Sheridan helped me become a better teacher.

Now I want to get out there more and help others find the simplicity they crave.

Now it’s your turn:

I’m taking bookings for 2018. If you want me to give my “Fighting Complexity” speech at your event please visit my speaker page to find out more about what I can do for you.

And if you want to see a little more of the beautiful country of Montenegro please watch my VLOG.